Elephants in Stilletos

I was intending to post this yesterday but my brief intoduction to Inktober ended up taking a lot longer than planned, so I postponed this one…

Yesterday’s prompt word for Inktober was “Pressure”. As usual, I thought about several possible avenues for interpreting this prompt, one of which was the scientific definition of pressure as force over area. This reminded me of a fun fact I learned while I was at school, namely that a woman in stiletto heels will do more damage to a wooden floor than an elephant, because although she weighs a lot less than the elephant (assuming average-sized women and elephants), all her weight is concentrated over a very small area compared to the elephant’s feet.

While thinking about this yesterday, it occurred to me that this was all based on the assumption (to be fair, probably a fairly safe one) that the elephant isn’t also wearing stiletto heels. This set me off on a rare foray into cartoon-style illustration:

Probably not one of my best sketches ever, but it was quite fun to make. I also took a bit of time to do my own calculations to verify the assertion that a woman in stilettos exerts more force than a barefoot elephant.

To do this, I looked up a few figures and estimated a few others.

According to an article appearing in the Independent in 2017, the average weight for a woman in the UK is 11 stone. That’s slightly higher than I expected, but I decided to go with that figure. Converting to metric units, that’s close enough to 70kg, so we can use that for our woman’s weight.

Except that it’s actually her mass, since weight is a force (gravity) acting on a massive object (i.e. an object that has mass, not necessarily a particularly large one) and is dependent on the strength of the gravitational field it’s in. We actually need the weight for our calculation (as pressure is force/area), but that’s easy enough to calculate from the mass. Newton’s 2nd law says that force is mass times acceleration (F=ma if you like equations, as I do) and in this case the acceleration is that due to gravity. That varies from place to place around the world but it’s roughly 9.81 metres per second squared. For my rough calculations, I decided that a nice round figure of 10m/s2 would do fine. So our average woman weighs about 700 Newtons.

I didn’t make a note of where I found the figures for an elephant but apparently a female African Bush Elephant weighs on average around 3 tons. I’m not sure if that’s supposed to be long tons or short tons, but either way I decided that just calling it 3 metric tonnes (3000kg) would be close enough. Again, that’s actually the elephant’s mass (everyday language tends to be shockingly imprecise when it comes to such things), and her weight would be 30,000N using the same figure of 10m/s2 for the acceleration due to gravity. Incidentally, I decided that since our woman is (by definition) female, I’d go with a female elephant too (they tend to be a bit smaller than the males) and since I tend to think of African savannas before African forests or any part of India when thinking of elephants, I opted for an African Bush Elephant (a species that’s generally somewhat bigger than the the other two varieties).

That bit was relatively easy. Working out the areas was slightly more problematic, especially for the woman in stilettos. You will probably be relieved to hear that I don’t have any stilettos in my own shoe collection, and I was too lazy to go out and find a woman with high heels so I could measure the surface area of her heels and toes together or figure out how much of her weight would be concentrated on each part of her foot. For the initial calculation, at least, I wanted to work on the assumption that both the woman and the elephant would be standing with their weight evenly distributed across all their legs (that sounds a bit weird for the woman – obviously “all” is just “both” in her case!). A bit of online research revealed that stiletto heels usually have a diameter of no more than one centimetre, but I couldn’t find anything out about the area of the front part of the foot that would be in contact with the ground and presumably bear its share of the weight. I settled for a rough estimate of about 1cm2 for the surface area of each heel and 50cm2 for the surface area of the toe/ball of each foot. For convenience I tweaked the latter down to 49cm2, giving a total surface area of 100cm2 for both feet (heels and toes combined).

The elephant’s foot size was actually a bit easier to determine. Apparently a typical African Elephant has feet between 40 and 50cm in diameter. I decided to give the woman a bit of a helping hand by assuming our elephant had relatively small feet (hence providing less area to spread the weight) and therefore a 40cm diameter, or 20cm radius which, if we assume that the feet are circular, gives a surface area of about 1250cm2 per foot or 5000cm2 for all four feet.

To ensure our final units are correctly expressed as Pascals, or Newtons per square metre, it’s handy at this stage to convert those areas into square metres rather than square centimetres. The woman, standing with both feet firmly on the floor is putting all her 700N of weight through 0.01m2 of the floor, while the elephant’s 30,000N is being spread across 0.5m2 with the net result that the woman is exerting 70,000N/m2 or 70kPa of pressure on the floor, while the elephant is exerting only 60,000N/m2 or 60kPa. So our average woman is indeed liable to do a bit more damage to our delicate wooden floor than our average elephant, though the figures are actually quite close.

The difference gets more pronounced if they both put all their weight on a smaller area. I’m not sure how practical it would be to rest all your weight on one heel while wearing stilettos (mind you, I’m not convinced it’s very practical to wear stilettos in the first place) but suppose she’s able to do so, our woman is now channeling 700N through an area of just 1cm2 or 0.0001m2 which makes for 7MPa of pressure (that’s 7 Megapascals, 7 million Pascals or 7×106Pa if you’re not afraid of scientific notation – it’s definitely much more convenient than long trails of zeroes at either end of your numbers). Assuming that it’s enough of a challenge for our elephant to stand on just one foot, without going up on her toes or heels, she would be putting 30kN through 0.125m2, which amounts to 2.4×105Pa, which is 240kPa or 0.24MPa – significantly less than the woman on one heel.

Since my cartoon was based on the idea that an elephant wearing stilettos would do more damage to the floor than a woman in stilettos, I couldn’t leave this set of calculations without considering the pressure exerted by our elephant if she were to don a set of stiletto heels. Presumably these would have to be custom made and I’ve no idea how big they would be, nor whether she’d wear them on all four feet or just two, so let’s assume that the heels themselves culminate in points the same size as the woman’s ones, i.e. 1cm2 each and the elephant has somehow managed to contrive to stand with all her 30kN of weight bearing down on just one of these heels. That would make for a pressure of 3×108Pa, or 300MPa. As we would expect, our elephant in stilettos would do considerably more damage to any floor than our woman. It’s probably just as well that elephants are not, as far as I’m aware, in the habit of wearing stiletto heels.

I should probably add that it’s been a good few years since I last did this sort of calculation, so I hope I haven’t made any major mistakes with my units or figures, or any assumptions that are too crazy (apart from the basic premise itself, perhaps). Still, I’m fairly confident, at least that the claim made by my cartoon is fundamentally correct:

An average-sized woman in stiletto heels exerts more pressure on the floor than an average-sized elephant…

… unless, of course, the elephant is also wearing stilettos!

(Magnus Forrester-Barker, 2021-10-09)

Ink-tastic

Since I last posted, just over a month ago, I’ve been continuing to do more or less regular drawing, with both my iPad and more traditional media. As I’d hoped, my life drawing class restarted about 3 weeks ago and I’ve really enjoyed being back there. I also decided to have another go at Inktober this year.

Inktober is one of those month-long daily challenge things that seem to be all the rage these days. This particular one, as the name suggests, takes place annually in October and is based around doing daily drawing. Officially it’s supposed to be done using ink in a pen or brush (with optional pencil underdrawing), but the real purpose of Inktober according to its creator, Jake Parker, is to encourage creativity and help people to improve their skills and develop positive drawing habits, so other things such as digital art are fair game (it says so in the official Inktober faq, so that’s good enough for me). There is an official prompt list that you can follow or ignore as you see fit, and artists of all skill levels are encouraged to post their results to social media, though that is optional.

I first did Inktober in 2019 and that time I did it with black ink on white paper and mostly (though perhaps not exclusively) using a Pentel brush pen that was recommended by Jake Parker (and, as I recall, a pencil for under-drawing on a few of the days though not all that many). I stuck to the official prompt list for that year, though with loose interpretations of some of the prompts (my favourite one being “legend”, which I chose to read as “leg-end” and therefore I drew a self-portrait of my foot). All my Inktober 2019 drawings can be seen in one album on Flickr.

There is also a thing called Inktober52 which replaces the daily drawings for a month with weekly drawings for a year. I’m not sure if that first started in 2020, but that’s certainly when I first gave it a try (and the first year for which I can find a prompt list online). Unfortunately, as we all know, 2020 pretty quickly became pretty hectic and I didn’t get beyond the first 9 weeks of drawings. Still, the ones I did are available in another Flickr album. This time I again mostly worked with black ink on white paper, but with a range of different pens and occasional brushes. The sketch that ended up being my final one of the series was done in multiple colours (using non-waterproof ink and a wet paintbrush to provide a bit of blending) and I think I was intending to do a bit more work with diferent colours and quite possibly try a few other things as well.

By last October I was completely out of the habit of drawing so I don’t think I even considered doing Inktober, and it was much the same for this year’s Inktober52. However, having restarted with my drawing in the last couple of months I was keen to give Inktober another go this time round. Initially I was planning to use black ink again, but since I’m currently still trying to get to grips with using Procreate on my iPad, I decided that this would be a great opportunity to get in some extra practice and perhaps to push my explorations in directions they wouldn’t otherwise go. So for me, this year’s Inktober is being done with virtual ink. To keep more or less within the spirit of Inktober, and to provide a bit of focus, I’m restricting myself (at least initially) to the brushes within the “Inking” section of Procreate’s default brush library and mostly working in black on white, but mixing it up a little bit when the subject matter, or my personal muse, calls for other approaches.

So far I’ve managed to do one drawing every day (although I think one of them was finished slighlty after midnight) and I’m putting them all in yet another Flickr album, as well as on Instagram (where my previous Inktober/Inktober52 sketches went as well – in fact, I haven’t yet got round to using my Instagram account for anything else, although I originally set it up with the intention of sharing my Figuary 2019 portfolio there; in the end those sketches just went into one more Flickr album). All being well, I’ll reach the end of Inktober 2021 with a full set of 31 drawings (plus a few extras inspired by them) and a much better handle on how to use my current range of digital art tools.

Brushing Up Again (Part Two)

As promised yesterday, here’s a bit more about my recent adventures with digital art on an iPad using the Procreate app.

I have mostly been practising by doing a handful of simple abstract paintings and more-or-less daily life drawings (fairly quick sketches from photo references). Indeed, one of my motivations to actually get on with trying to learn how to use my new digital art platform (having bought the hardware components, if not the software, several months ago) is the hope that my life drawing classes may be able to restart soon and the attendant realisation that my drawing skills have got some what rusty through neglect in the last year or so (I dropped out of the daily sketching habit around last April and have only done a handful of random sketches since then).

Having begun to get a handle on the basics of using Procreate, and beginning to feel some of my (albeit limited) artistic mojo returning and adapting well enough to the new medium, I decided to have a go at some more painting-styled work.

As my first subject, I selected an avocado plant that’s growing (in a pot) on my windowsill. Here’s what the painting looks like at the moment (it’s probably a work in progress, but I may decide just to quit while I’m ahead):

I started with a rough sketch to establish the basic composition. I then dialed back the opacity of that layer and set up several new ones to contain the painted background, the pot and the plant itself, each with a layer of their own. In each of these I used the “acrylic paint” brush at various different sizes.

My process was quite similar to how I’d approach a painting with actual acrylic paints, and the result is definitely quite a similar style too. It was definitely nice not to have to worry about mixing up sufficient quantities of paint or avoid contaminating one lot of paint with another, nor to have to wash my brushes afterwards or wait for one layer to dry before I could start on the next one. It’s also convenient to be able to go in and rework the background without having to worry about accidentally painting over any of the foreground details and it’s great to be able to try out different options without necessarily commiting to them.

For example, looking at the picture now, I wonder if a little bit of “inking” over the top to provide a bit more definition for some of the leaf edges and other structures might help the overall effect. In a traditional painting I’d have to make a decision and either leave it as it is (no pun intended) or commit to putting pen to paper (and I’m not actually sure how well it work to try drawing over acrylics, though I know it can work well with watercolours). With this digital painting, all I’d need to do (I’m not sure if I actually will) would be to add a new layer, do the drawing on there and if I don’t like it I can delete, or even just hide, it. And I’m not just limited to one experiment either – I could try a bunch of different things and then select the one(s), if any, that work best.

I don’t think I’ll be getting rid of my real paints and brushes just yet, but I suspect that I may well be doing the majority of my artwork (or at least the painting) with digital media from now on.

(And in case you’re wondering, I actually wrote this last night hot on the heels of the previous post – I didn’t get up bright and early to write and post it and I may in fact still be in bed!)

Brushing Up Again (Part One)

A few months ago, I decided to get myself an iPad. There were several reasons for this but one of the main ones was that I wanted a better platform for digital artwork than my cheap and cheerful Android tablet. I decided to push the boat out a reasonably long way and get myself a 4th generation iPad Air. If the experiences of other iPad users I know are a fair guide, Apple hardware seems to last a pretty long time and athough newer, more powerful models come out frequently the older ones continue to work and be well supported, so by getting a new one now I hopefully have a device that will keep going and be useful as more than an expensive paperweight for for a long time to come.

Some kind of stylus is pretty much required for any serious digital artwork on a tablet and the Apple Pencil is, by common consensus, agreed to be the best by far of the options available for the iPad. Unsurprising, as it’s made by Apple themselves. However, it has a correspondingly large price tag and my budget didn’t stretch to getting one of those at the same time as my iPad. Instead I got a relatively cheap stylus (about £15, as I recall, compared to over £100 for a 2nd generation Apple Pencil or around £80 for a 1st generation one that would still work but have some limitations). It’s not quite as fully featured and, probably most crucially for drawing, not pressure sensitive but certainly enough to get me started and learn the basics of the apps I’ll be using. At some point I may invest in an actual Apple Pencil.

Initially I installed Autodesk Sketchbook, a free app that is also available for Android (and, I think, a bunch of other platforms, not all tablet/phone based). I have used this on my Android phone and tablet and got on ok with it, though I never really got comfortable with the interface. My experiences with it on the Mac were slighlty better, due to a bit more screen real estate (certainly compared to my phone), a better stylus and much more responsive handling than my old tablet. Still, I didn’t find myself particularly loving it and wanting to do lots of drawing.

A few weeks ago I decided to take the plunge and buy myself a copy of Procreate, a very highly regarded (and iPad exclusive) drawing app that costs the princely sum of £8.99 or so (a one-off payment). Most reviews I read that compared it to Autodesk Sketchbook said that Procreate was a more powerful bit of software but harder to learn. Undaunted I purchased it anyway and was pleasantly surprised to find that, for me at least, the interface is much more intuitive and the overall drawing experience much more pleasant. This isn’t to knock Autodesk at all – that is also a very capable app (I don’t want to damn it with faint praise by adding “especially considering the price point”) and I’m sure if I devoted enough effort to it I could learn it well enough, but I think Procreate is the one for me.

There is plenty still to learn of course, and lots of scope for frustration along the way (even just with respect to itself, let alone my own artistic abilities or lack thereof). For instance, one evening I finished a sketch I was particularly happy with and then, noticing that it was showing up in my gallery in landscape format (when it was supposed to be a portrait format sketch), I tried to rotate it by changing the canvas size and inadvertently ended up cropping off the entire top half of the sketch. For some reason, this seemed to be a one-way process and it wouldn’t let me undo the change, which is usually possible with digital editing and is one of the major attractions of it compared to traditional media. I ended up just having to settle for half a sketch. Fortunately, soon after that I discovered how to rotate the images in the gallery without having to change the canvas size, so I should be able to avoid making that particular mistake again, though I’m sure there are plenty of others still to be made.

I was going to go on to talk a bit more about the actual creative process and put in a picture of the painting I’m currently working on, but this is getting quite long already so I’ll save that for another day.

P.S. I originally entitled this post simply Brushing Up, and then made it Brushing Up (Part One) when I realised it was going to be a two-parter (at least). After I published it I had a read back through my earlier art related blog posts and discovered that the very first one was also called Brushing Up. I have therefore reamed this one. Actually, the first line of that post is almost as applicable now (although it hasn’t been quite such a long gap this time): “After far too long a gap, I have recently begun to draw and paint again.”

Finally made it!

Tonight’s dinner was a partial success.

When I was putting together my latest grocery order, to arrive a couple of days ago, I decided to make a chile con carne as my main meal for the weekend (by which I mean that I would cook enough for several days, eat some both today and tomorrow and probably freeze the rest, not that I’d only have one proper meal over the weekend). Unlike the last several times this has been my plan, I actually remembered to add some chilli peppers to my order, so I’d count that as the first successful bit of the endeavour 🙂

When it came to making the meal, things looked promising. As well as the usual minced beef, chillis, onion and suchlike, I put in a bit of finely diced carrot and courgette, as I had some of each vegetable that were in need of using up. I also added a dash of vermouth, and I had high hopes for this being a good one.

Unfortunately I got slightly distracted doing other things while I left it to simmer and got back to the kitchen just in time to find it starting to burn as the liquid, which had seemed ample when I left it, had by now all boiled off or been absorbed. I was able to rescue it from being a complete inedible disaster (or worse, setting fire to my kitchen) but suffice it to say that this chile con carbon was not quite the sumptuous delight I had been anticipating. It will be interesting to see how it is tomorrow, as such dishes are often better on the second day when the flavours have had time to develop but in this case the flavours may be a little on the smoky side!

More successful was the side dish, as I’ve finally got round to having a go at making guacamole almost 30 years after first being shown how to make it.

Back then I was still at school, and it was a different, more innocent era in which teachers could invite their pupils over to their homes for things like extra-curricular computer programming lessons, which I very much doubt any sensible and well-intentioned teacher would dare to do these days (even ignoring the minor issue of a global pandemic). One of my teachers had lent me a computer and was teaching me how to program it, which entailed fairly frequent bike journeys (usually on Saturday afternoons) from my village to his in order to take some lessons. As well as getting a good foundation in programming (I was learning Pascal, not a language I’ve ever seriously used since then, but the basic principles of how to program a computer have largely stuck with me), I was introduced to some seriously good music (the highlight being the Penguin Café Orchestra, whose music I continue to enjoy to this day) and, on one occasion, was shown how to make guacamole. This was because my teacher, who had spent some time working in Mexico before joining our school, was preparing for a party that evening and was busy making some using an authentic Mexican recipe when I arrived.

Sadly I didn’t write down that recipe and don’t remember a huge amount from it, except that it involved mashing avocados with salt, pepper and a few other things in a bowl (with a fork, IIRC). Fast forward to this evening and I had an avocado that I’d bought pretty much on a whim in my grocery order the other day; rather than do my usual thing of cutting it in half and eating it out of the skin garnished with a bit of black pepper and perhaps some mayonnaise, I decided the time had come to try out making guacamole for myself. Fortunately there are plenty of recipes online, so I was able to get a general idea of how to do it (to supplement my memories from the last millenium) and then improvised from there. I was very pleased with how it turned out.

Basically, I finely chopped an onion and a chilli pepper (carefully saved from cooking my main dish) and stuck them in a pestle and mortar (well, technically just in the mortar) with the flesh of an avocado, a bit of salt and pepper and a couple of teaspoons of lime juice. I then mashed the whole lot down (with the pestle, of course) and enjoyed eating it with a bit of tortilla. It may be worth noting that I had previously used the pestle and mortar to grind up some cumin, salt and pepper for the chile and had only given it a brief wipe out in between, so there was almost certainly a little bit of cumin in the guacamole too.

The other components of the meal also worked pretty well (namely, a bottle of well-chilled Mexican lager – not generally the sort of beer I go for, but ideal in the right context – a lovely bit of brie and then a couple of Mr Kipling’s trifle bakewells, which happened to be on special offer this week, for dessert). So if you count each of the individual components more or less equally, I’d say the whole meal rated about 4.5 out of 5.

And hopefully it will be less than 30 years before I next get round to making guacamole!

Bottoms Up!

Last night I made an exciting discovery.

Well, not perhaps that exciting in the grand scheme of things but something that pleased me anyway and resolved a mystery that’s been bugging me for the last year.

I’ve been playing computer games on and off for quite a few years (all the way back to the early 1980s when my family got a ZX Spectrum for Christmas and my first go on it consisted of playing the racing game Checkered Flag (IIRC) until I crashed out at the first bend on the Silverstone race track.

In the past year or so I’ve been getting back into gaming on my trusty PC and almost a year ago I got myself a gamepad to provide a more convenient control method for some of the games I was playing. My shiny new controller was an X-Box one (also compatible with Windows PCs – I must admit that while I prefer Linux or MacOS for pretty much everything else, I do tend to use Windows for gaming as it generally works more or less out of the box and there are a lot more games available on the platform).

It’s a great little device and for many games is much better than trying to use a keyboard and mouse. Just one thing always bugged me. As well as a plethora of buttons and a couple of little joystick things on the top surface, there are 4 buttons on the back (relative to the way you naturally hold the controller, which is pleasantly ergonomic). These are labelled LT, LB, RT and RB. The L and R part was obvious enough as they are on the left and right sides respectively. The T and B part confused me, though, as I assumed they stood for Top and Bottom, yet the T ones were clearly below the B ones!

Last night I was looking up the controls for my latest favourite game, Red Dead Redemption 2, in order to figure out a couple of details I’d been missing despite playing it avidly for the last fortnight or so. I came across a handy list which referred to “Left Trigger”, “Right Bumper” etc. My first thought was that this seemed a much more sensible naming scheme than “Left Top”, “Right Bottom” and so on, as the letters corresponded to the physical reality of the controller…

… and then it occurred to me that these were the actual names of the buttons and I’d been thinking of them wrongly all this time. This is a good reminder of the basic principle that was instilled into me through my many (and now, admittedly, fairly distant) years of mathematical training: to always examine your assumptions. As a slightly clichéd but still true phrase puts it, to assume makes an ass of u and me!

The end of the road

I’ve lived in my current house for almost 10 years. It’s in the middle of a housing estate which, like many others, consists of a main road with several side roads branching off it. In my case the main road drops down a hill and I live on one of the side roads near the bottom. A little bit further down, another side road off to the right connects with another estate and then back out into the town, while the main road around which my estate is built heads off to the left.

Usually I get in and out of the estate either via this side road to the right or going down an alley that provides a convenient short cut out of the estate if you’re on foot or a bike (as I usually am), or sometimes I go up the hill to the top. I have no real occasion to follow the main road round to the left past the turn-off, although I did once drop round to visit someone on another side road a bit further down. I’d never actually gone all the way to the end of the road!

Last week I had a letter delivered to me by accident that was actually supposed to go to a house on a similarly named road in town. I was intending to write a note on the envelope and stick it back in the post box, but when I looked up the location of the other road (to satisfy my own curiosity) I discovered it was actually slightly closer to my house than the postbox is (going up the hill instead of down), so I decided it was better just to pop round and post it directly through the door.

Apart from a weekly bike ride to go shopping and check the post at my office, I’d not actually got round to leaving my house / garden since the lockdown started. I felt quite invigorated by this brief walk and decided that it’s probably a good idea to go for at least a short walk (allowed under the daily exercise provision) on any day when the weather’s not too awful and I’m not going out on my bike. I may get this year’s running season off to a start soon (though I realise I probably haven’t mentioned running yet on my blog as I only got into that after my final post of last year and I’ve been having a winter break since mid-October).

The first couple of days I stuck to a couple of my fairly well-trod routes, but on Saturday I decided the time had finally come to walk to the end of the road. It turns out that it’s slightly less than half a kilometre from my front door, and the road ends at a gate leading into a field. I think it’s a public right of way so I may go back soon and investigate further.

Another, more figurative, end of the road almost happened today as well.

A few days I ordered a couple of bits I needed for my computer from Amazon. I know they are one of the big, bad corporate giants but they are a very convenient one-stop shopping location for so many things, and generally give a pretty reliable service. I was pleasantly surprised when I had an email this morning to say that my parcel, which I was expecting on Wednesday, was now due for delivery this afternoon. I was pleased (though not surprised) when it turned up. I was less pleased when I found that the end of the box was open and only one of the two items I’d ordered was actually inside. The one which actually turned up, in case you’re wondering, was an external CD player for my new office laptop; the missing one was an external hard drive,intended for backup purposes.

My guess is that the box was probably not securely fastened during the packing process and the hard drive fell out somewhere in transit, though it’s possible that somebody may have helped it out, or even that it was never put in there in the first place. In any case, since my Amazon orders page quite clearly showed both items being included in the package, and the package having been delivered, and since I had received the package with a loose end and just about enough empty space in the box for the missing item (which wouldn’t be labelled with any delivery information), I figured it would be best to alert Amazon immediately rather than waiting to see if it would turn up separately.

Cue much frustration as I searched in vain for a means to flag up delivery problems other than a package which hadn’t arrived at all (basically – contact the courier and ask them about it) or to return items which had arrived but were somehow defective (I tried using that approach but it wanted to put me in touch with the manufacturer who in this instance can’t be held to blame!). I was just on the verge of giving up, and beginning to seriously consider cancelling my Amazon account by way of protest (and also concern that they didn’t seem to provide any mechanism to contact them in case of snafus such as this one), when I finally spotted a “Contact Us” link tucked away in submenu at the bottom of their Customer Service page (itself only accessible, as far as I could see, via a link hidden at the very bottom of the page footer).

This link led me to a chat setup which started with a chatbot to establish the nature of the help request before putting me through to a human assistant (who went by the name of Luv – not sure if that’s their real name). While I was deeply unimpressed by the difficulty of locating this avenue of help, I was very satisfied by the service I got from Luv. Within 5 minutes of hooking up to the chat, I had briefly explained the problem and accepted the offer of a replacement item to be sent to me as soon as possible (an offer that was made without quibble – I was offered a refund as an alternative, but since the item is something I need I figured a replacement would be the better option). It’s not due to arrive until early next week, but that’s fair enough in the circumstances (and if my recent orders which have actually arrived are anything to go by I may get it a bit sooner).

Anyway, that’s quite enough rambling for now. It is time for me to nip out into the early evening sunshine and take my daily walk.