Not quite self-sufficient

In principle, I’m very much in favour of the idea of growing one’s one food.  However, I’m glad I don’t have to rely on eating what I’ve grown for myself…

Today I harvested the first-fruits of this year’s yield from my garden – just enough spinach and rhubarb to contribute to tonight’s dinner (fortunately I was dining alone, as it wouldn’t have stretched).  That’s already better than last year, when I don’t think I managed to get anything at all edible out of my garden despite trying to grow several things, but I’m not expecting very much more of either crop and I’m doubtful that my sprouts are going to produce anything at all.  I should get a nice crop of nasturtium leaves if I actually remember to harvest them this year.

I steamed the spinach and enjoyed that as an accompaniment to the pasta con funghi (and other random ingredients, all non-home-grown)  that I cooked up for dinner. I’m sure there are more adventurous ways of preparing spinach but this simple approach works perfectly well and I didn’t want anything too complex to clash with the array of flavours in the pasta dish.

The rhubarb went, as it usually does in my kitchen, into a crumble.  There was only just enough fruit to cover the base of the dish, so I ended up letting the crumble topping mix in with it rather than sit on top.  I also varied this crumble a bit by using honey instead of sugar to sweeten the rhubarb (along with a dash of lemon juice – the citrus seems to complement the rhubarb quite well – and a bit of water) and drizzling a bit more on top, as well as using a mixture of plain and self-raising flour (instead of just plain) to make the crumble.  I’m not sure if that pushes it towards cobbler territory, as I can’t remember whether the use of raising agents is the differentiating factor (if there is one) between cobblers and crumbles, but it certainly helped to lighten it a bit, which was quite useful given the higher than usual crumble-to-fruit ratio.

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