Back to Babylon

My Doctor Who read-through project has now restarted following a 3 month break which occurred in a fairly unlikely place – namely the middle of the Key To Time season.  I would usually aim to have my breaks in between seasons, and certainly not in the middle of one of the most cohesive story-arc seasons of the entire run of classic Who, but for various reasons I felt (mostly subconsciously, I think) that it would be good to go away and read/do other stuff for a while before coming back to the books.  I’m now hoping to get at least to the end of Tom Baker’s stories (only about 2 more seasons to go) before I have another break.

As well as this, I’ve just started another sci-fi related project that’s been on the cards for sometime, namely a re-watch of my Babylon 5 DVD collection, which encompasses the whole 5 season run of the original TV series as well as most (though, I think probably not quite all) of the spin-offs.

I first encountered B5, as the series is usually known for short, when it was first aired in the UK in the mid 1990s.  My attention was grabbed mainly by the fact that much, if not all the graphics work, was done on the Amiga, which was my computer of choice at the time (although they used rather higher-spec ones than my basic A500+).  As far as I can recall, I watched the first episode or two but wasn’t greatly impressed by it at the time.  I think it was probably being shown at a time that was awkward for me to watch it and I was busy doing my A-levels and getting ready to go off to university (where I was without access to a TV for most of the time), so I didn’t pay it much further attention at the time (a very similar story to what happened with Buffy the Vampire Slayer, another series that I’ve subsequently come to appreciate greatly).

Fast forward a few years, to around 10 years ago, and I was invited by one of my friends who, like me, was a bit of an SF geek but, unlike me at that point, was also a fairly big fan of B5, to join him in watching the entire series which he had on a combination of VHS tapes and DVDs (actually, he may only have had the first couple of seasons when we started watching but I think he planned to collect them all and eventually did).  His enthusiasm was sufficient to get me to agree to watch a few episodes and pretty soon I was hooked.  We didn’t have a particularly regular B5 viewing schedule but I think we managed to get through the first 2 or 3 seasons fairly quickly, often watching several episodes at a time.

Unfortunately (or perhaps not) our plans were interrupted as life got in the way – mainly because he got married and then fairly soon moved away to the other end of the country (in fairness to his wife, who was (and is) also quite a close friend of mine, we did keep watching B5 together until they left North Wales, just not as frequently as before), which left me stranded somewhere around the end of season 3, just when the main story arc was picking up towards its exciting denouement.

My solution to this tragedy was to get myself a box set of the entire series as soon as I managed to find one at a reasonable price.  It didn’t take me too long after that to finish watching it and since then I’ve been waiting for a good time to start again from the beginning.  I have decided that the time has now come and, over the past couple of days I’ve watched the first few episodes of the TV series (forgetting that there was a prequel film and a pilot episode in my collection that I had intended to watch in the correct chronological order this time round).

It’s quite interesting to revisit the early episodes with a knowledge of where the story is heading and who the main characters are, in contrast to the blissful ignorance with which I approached the series last time round.  I don’t know how long it will take to get through the whole series, and I’m not in a particular rush to do so.

One notable feature of B5 is that it has one big story arc running through the whole thing and the creator (J. Michael Straczynski) knew where he was finally aiming for when he started, even if many of the actual details were fleshed out later.  That said, most of the episodes would actually work reasonably well as stand-alones (though some would probably be quite confusing without knowing the back-story; as I recall there are quite a few episodes which give sufficient exposition that you could catch up reasonably well without seeing everything from the beginning).  Actually, the story was apparently originally intended to run for 5 seasons but it looked likely it would be cancelled at the end of the fourth season so they had to cram two seasons’ worth of material into a single season in order to get to the intended finishing point by the season 4 finale, only to find that they did get a fifth season after all and therefore had to bolt a whole bunch of extra stuff on.  Certainly the fourth season feels a bit rushed and the final season is quite different from the earlier ones (with my favourite character – Ivanova – sadly absent and several other fairly major line-up changes).

If I had to make a shortlist of my favourite SF TV series, I’m sure that Babylon 5 would be somewhere very near the top (alongside Doctor Who and Firefly).

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1 Comment

  1. B5 rocks – I’ve the same boxset and found season 1 a bit slow apart from babylon 4 episode. There is a major shift with Boxter coming in and vaylan appearing, it switched from average to AWESOME. The slide of characters from grey to darker/lighter is amazing…

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