To clip or not toe clip?

Just over a week ago, my bike started making some alarming squeaking noises from the vicinity of its transmission system (i.e. chain, bottom bracket etc.).

At first I didn’t have time to properly investigate, so I just slapped on some WD-40 (in case it was a simple lubrication issue) and hoped for the best.  That seemed to clear it up for about a day, but the problem soon came back and in addition to the disturbing noise I was becoming more aware of something feeling decidedly out-of-kilter.

When I investigated further, I discovered that the problem was in the right-hand pedal, whose bearings seemed to be on their last legs.  This was both a good and a bad thing, but on balance mostly good.

The main downside is that the pedal is essentially a sealed unit so there is no way to get in and mend it and the only option is to get a new one (or ideally two, so you retain a matched pair).

The first positive thing is that it’s a lot easier and cheaper to replace a pair of pedals than the entire bottom bracket assembly, which I had feared was about to go the way of all flesh.

The second positive is that I didn’t actually have to buy new pedals as I was able to take the ones off my mountain bike (which is currently and probably permanently off the road due to a bottom bracket shell issue that I’ve previously mentioned) and put them on my road bike.  Fortunately, unlike many of the other fittings of this bike (which is a fairly old French one), the pedals seem to use the same standardised size of fittings as most other bikes.

The third, and possibly biggest, positive is that, as a result of putting my mountain bike pedals on the road bike I’ve finally got round to getting toeclips onto it, which I’ve been intending to do more-or-less since I started riding this bike (or at least since I restarted using it a couple of years ago – I hadn’t become a convert to the joys of toeclips when I first had the bike).

Toeclips are designed to enable both of your legs to exert force the whole time you are pedalling, rather than just the leg which is pushing down at any given time.  This, fairly obviously, increases the efficiency of pedalling and is an especially noticeable benefit when you’re cycling up steep hills (a more or less unavoidable feature of cycling in Wales).  As an extra benefit, they also ensure your feet remain in a more-or-less optimal position for pedalling (assuming you’ve got the bike set up correctly), with the balls of the feet making contact with the pedal.

In both these respects, pedals with clips are better than traditional pedals without clips (which, confusingly, are not the same thing as clipless pedals), while retaining the convenience of being able to use them with more or less any shoes.  The only real downside is that the clips are a bit bulky and can get caught up on passing obstacles when you’re wheeling the bike, but it’s not a great problem.

Clipless pedals are ones which come with some system of cleats (there are also quite a few mutually-incompatible clipless systems), which enable you to attach your feet securely to the pedals to get the same benefits as using clips but to an even greater degree.  I’ve never tried them myself but they are supposed to be better than clips both in taking up less space (in fact, they are usually quite a bit smaller than ordinary pedals without clips) and providing better energy transfer.  They potentially also make it harder for somebody to grab your bike and ride off with it since you can’t easily ride them without the proper shoes.  That, of course, is also the main downside since you need to get a special pair of shoes (in some cases, it’s an ordinary pair of shoes to which you add cleats) to use the bike and, I think, you’d probably need to carry another pair of shoes to change into when you got off the bike as it’s probably not very comfortable (or good for the cleats) to walk far on them.

In any case, I’m very happy with my clipped pedals, which I’ve had on my mountain bike for the past 8 or 10 years and show no immenent signs of wearing out.

 

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