Welsh Grannies and Navajo Rugs

After a break of several years, I’ve recently taken up knitting and crochet again (I never officially stopped but I didn’t get around to making anything – apart from a case for my mobile phone – in the last 3 or 4 years).

Having refreshed my memory on the basic skills, I’ve plunged straight into trying a few new things in crochet.  In particular, I’ve finally got round to entering the worlds of granny squares and thread crochet.

Granny squares are probably the stereotypical crochet motif, as well as a staple of 1970s fashion.  They are relatively quick and simple to make and can be very colourful and versatile, offering plenty of scope for the imagination as well as a good opportunity to use up scraps of yarn without having to worry too much about carefully following patterns.  Just the kind of thing I like, so it’s perhaps fairly surprising that I never got round to making one in my earlier crochet career.

Last week, though, I bought a book entitled The Crochet Answer Book (2nd Edition) by Edie Eckman.  This contained a simple recipe for granny squares and I decided to try it out as I was reading.  The result, in the space of half an hour or so, was my first ever granny square, made using some oddments of yarn (which happened to be in the Welsh flag colours) and a hook I had to hand:
Granny Square #1

This, like all the crochet I’d previously done, was using yarn.  However, there’s also a strong tradition of using thread (and much smaller hooks) for crochet.  The basic techniques are the same, but the scale is somewhat smaller.

I decided last week that the time had come to try out crochet using thread, since I’d acquired a set of hooks that included several thread hooks as well as yarn ones and I wanted to put these to use.  I ordered 3 balls of #10 crochet thread (pretty much the standard size, I gather; it’s made of mercerised cotton and is quite a bit thicker than standard sewing thread but much finer than yarn), which again happened to be in the Welsh flag colours.

My very first attempt with thread, on Saturday morning (once the threads I’d ordered had turned up), was a quick Möbius band.  After this, I decided to try another granny square using thread.  My thought was that this might make quite a useful coaster.

I went for the same design (including colour scheme) as the first granny square but extended it to six rounds (instead of 3) in order to make a suitable size to sit under a mug.  It was worked with a 1.75mm hook and took perhaps a couple of hours to work up (I did quite a lot of it simultaneously with some other tasks, so it’s difficult to say for sure).  Here it is, fresh off the hook:
Granny Square #2 (FO); AKA Welsh Granny Coaster

If you look carefully at the lower left corner of this photo, you may spot what I noticed shortly after I’d finished tidying up the thread ends (i.e. the point at which it became too late to do anything about it) – a slight mistake whereby I accidentally worked an extra group of 3 stitches (in the red thread) into the middle of one of the groups in the previous round.  The result is effectively that there’s an extra stitch group along one side of the square in the last couple of rounds and a bit of a hold in one of the stitch groups in the white round.  Fortunately it doesn’t seem to have distorted the square shape too badly and it’s not too noticeable unless you look carefully but it does break up the symmetry a bit.

I could rip half the work out and redo it (this would probably require the removal of the entire last two rounds), or just put up with the mistake.  However, I remembered something I was once told about Navajo rugs, namely that they are always made with one deliberate and obvious imperfection woven into the fabric.  Apparently this is supposed to let the spirit in and out of the blanket.  Using Google, I managed to track down a reference to this on Brian McLaren’s blog and I’m fairly sure that when I first heard about the idea it was Richard Rohr who was being quoted (as McLaren does on his blog).  I don’t believe that the rugs (or my coaster) need a hole for spirits to get in or out, and I can’t claim that I incorporated the imperfection on purpose, but I like the idea that perfection “is not the elimination of imperfection… [but] the ability to recognize, forgive, and include imperfection!” (to quote Rohr directly) and therefore I can view this as a reminder rather than a mistake.

 

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All at sea

The sea has always held a certain fascination for me and it’s long been one of my dreams to try my hand at sailing.

I did have a quick go crewing a 2-man dinghy one afternoon last summer (or possibly the summer before – I lose track of time), which served to whet my appetite further.

Last night I got my second opportunity to sail – this time as part of the crew of a 30′ (or so) racing yacht called Mikki Finn.  We were racing up at Holyhead, where she is usually berthed, and we came fourth out of seven in the race.  Considering it was my first time ever sailing on a yacht, the third time for one of the other crew members and the first time out this year for the remaining two (as the boat has been ashore for repairs since the end of last season), that was not at all bad going.

My opportunity to sail Mikki Finn came because my friend Luke has been crewing her for several years now and was recently looking for someone to give him a hand with some of the aforementioned repairs.  I jumped at the chance and found myself a few weeks ago helping to refit the forestay, which led to an invite from the skipper, Mark, to join the crew.  Last week I went back to help again and the essential repairs were finished earlier this week, so she was able to go back in the water on Tuesday and be ready to race last night (there are still a few more repairs to do, but nothing to compromise her sea-worthiness).

Last night, I was mainly responsible for controlling one of the headsail sheets (i.e. the ropes used to control the sail at the front of the boat – the one we were using yesterday was a genoa, which you can look up for yourself if you’re so inclined), which is essentially the same job I had crewing on the dinghy, though in that case I was controlling both jib sheets at once.  A yacht, naturally, has much bigger sails and heavier rigging than a dinghy, so there are winches and things to help you and it becomes a multi-person job (at least if there are sufficient crew).  A handful of times I also had to run forward and skirt the genoa (i.e. bring the foot of it back inside the guardrail of the boat when it got caught up on the outside of it).

I’m looking forward to going sailing several more times in the coming weeks and increasing my knowledge and skill at nautical procedures.

 

Tipping Point

A few days ago (May the Fourth) was Star Wars Day, as I wrote about a couple of years ago.

Star Wars Day is an annual event. Today, however, sees a once-in-the-lifetime-of-the-universe event… the Star Wars Tipping Point.

This was defined (or at least brought to my attention) in an instalment of the wonderful XKCD webcomic back at the end of January (hopefully still available here) and is the point after which the release of The Phantom Menace (i.e. part one of the Star Wars saga and the first film in the prequel trilogy) is closer to the release of Return of the Jedi (part six and the final film of the original trilogy) than to the present day.

I haven’t actually verified the exact dates (which, I assume, are based on the screenings of the world premieres) but the years certainly seem to fit – RotJ came out in 1983 and tPM in 1999 (respectively 32 and 16 years ago).

Incidentally, Return of the Jedi was the second Star Wars film that I saw during its original run at the cinema and the first one I remember fairly clearly – I was too young to catch Star Wars itself (later retitled A New Hope), as I was only a year or so old when it came out, and I have vague memories of seeing The Empire Strikes Back in the cinema.  By the time of RoTJ I’d seen the first film several times on TV as it used to be a staple of British Christmas television.

Actually, after Return of the Jedi there was quite a long gap (until Judge Dredd came out, apparently in 1995) when I didn’t go to the cinema at all.  I then caught the rerelease of the entire (remastered) original trilogy when they where shown at the cinema in the year or two leading up to the Phantom Menace, and I saw the whole prequel trilogy at the cinema as they came out (mostly within a few days of the local premiere, I think).

When the new trilogy (episodes 7 – 9) come out over the next few years, I fully intend to watch them at the cinema too.  Episode 7 (The Force Awakens) is due out this December, though I may not get a chance to see it until early next year.  I’m not sure when episode 9 is due out, though I’d guess it should be around 2019.  I suppose the next big Star Wars Tipping Point will be when the time between releases of the first and last films (which will be roughly 42 years) is less than the time from the last one to the present moment (i.e. it will be sometime around 2061).