Patience

Yesterday (shortly after I’d decided to write about my bike) I came across a wonderful quote, used as the title for a photo (which you can see at Flickr if you want to — I haven’t included it here since it belongs to somebody else and I haven’t sought permission to reproduce it).

The quote (which happens to be in Spanish) is:

La paciencia es un árbol de raiz amarga, pero de frutos muy dulces

A translation (by me, without recourse to dictionaries, Google Translate etc., so I hope it’s reasonably accurate) is:

Patience is a tree with bitter roots but very sweet fruit

Actually, after I came up with the translation I looked back at the picture from which I borrowed it and discovered that a translation was given there, which was the same as mine but with a comma (as in the Spanish version) that I deemed unnecessary in the English rendering. I wasn’t aware of it before providing my own translation, but it’s possible that I’d subconsciously glimpsed it.

Also, since I first mentioned this quote on Facebook (very shortly after stumbling across it), it has been drawn to my attention that this is pretty much the same as a quote that’s variously attributed to Aristotle and Jean-Jacques Rousseau:

Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet

I couldn’t find any references to a specific source for the attribution to Aristotle (such as, for example, any of his writings) but I did find evidence that it didn’t originate with Rousseau. It appears (in French, as La patience est amère, mais son fruit est doux) on page 175 of the book Voyages en Perse et autres lieux de l’Orient by John Chardin, published in 1711, the year before Rousseau was born (a copy of the page can be seen here, courtesy of Google Books; I got to this information via Wikiquote). That’s not to say that Rousseau didn’t use it (perhaps having read it in Chardin’s book), or that Chardin didn’t get it ultimately from Aristotle, or even that Aristotle (if he did say / write it) didn’t get it from someone else.

I think it’s highly likely that the quote as used in the picture title came from this one that may or may not have been from Aristotle or Chardin, whether or not the artist who made and titled the picture was aware of the source, or whether she herself altered it to include the reference to the tree or came across it in that form (perhaps introduced more or less by accident when it was translated from Greek or French into Spanish, or perhaps done deliberately for extra poetic effect). In any case, I particularly like the version I first came across (not to mention the picture that went with it).

Definitely one to think about (and to take your time doing so!).

Previous Post
Next Post
Leave a comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: